States Where Alzheimer’s Is Expected to Increase Significantly

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15. Idaho
> Projected increase in adults 65+ with Alzheimer’s disease, 2020-2025: 22.2% (from 27,000 to 33,000)
> Pct. of population 65+: 15.4% — 17th lowest (total: 264,889)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s disease: 10.2% — 4th lowest
> Avg. retirement income: $24,250 — 18th lowest

The shares of people in Idaho who are 65 and older, 75 and older, as well as older people currently living with Alzheimer’s, are among the lowest in the county. Some 27,000 people 65 and over in Idaho have the disease, a number that is projected to increase to 33,000 by 2025. As a consequence of the expected growth in Alzheimer’s cases in Idaho, Medicaid costs of caring for residents with the disease are expected to climb between 2020 and 2025 by 31.2%, the fourth highest increase in the country.

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14. Texas
> Projected increase in adults 65+ with Alzheimer’s disease, 2020-2025: 22.5% (from 400,000 to 490,000)
> Pct. of population 65+: 12.3% — 3rd lowest (total: 3,462,527)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s disease: 11.6% — 25th highest
> Avg. retirement income: $27,075 — 21st highest

Texas has the third smallest share of the 65 and older population of any state, at 12.3%. The number of 65 and older state residents is expected to increase by 22.5% from 2020 to 2025, the 14th highest increase . In 2020, Medicare spent more than $3 billion on Texas residents living with Alzheimer’s, one of the highest amounts among all states.

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13. Montana
> Projected increase in adults 65+ with Alzheimer’s disease, 2020-2025: 22.7% (from 22,000 to 27,000)
> Pct. of population 65+: 18.2% — 6th highest (total: 190,711)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s disease: 11.5% — 25th lowest
> Avg. retirement income: $25,422 — 23rd lowest

Montana has the sixth highest share of adults 65 and over, and the share of those adults currently living with Alzheimer’s is 11.5%, which is in line with the U.S. average of 12.0%. Though the state has a relatively high share of residents who are 65 years or older with an average Alzheimer’s case incidence rate within that population, the mortality rate from Alzheimer’s among people of all ages is among the lowest in the country at 31 deaths per 100,000 people.

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12. New Hampshire
> Projected increase in adults 65+ with Alzheimer’s disease, 2020-2025: 23.1% (from 26,000 to 32,000)
> Pct. of population 65+: 17.5% — 9th highest (total: 235,795)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s disease: 11.0% — 15th lowest
> Avg. retirement income: $26,232 — 23rd highest

About 26,000 New Hampshire residents 65 and older were living with Alzheimer’s disease as of 2020. By 2025, that number is expected to increase by more than 23%. The condition primarily affects older adults, and the state’s population of 65 and older comprises 17.5% of New Hampshire residents, the ninth highest share of all states. The state’s estimated increase in Medicaid payments for older residents with the disease by 2025 is 31.9%, the third highest in the country. The U.S. Census estimates that 26.3% of New Hampshire residents will be 60 and older by 2030, a 40% increase in the share of the older population since 2012.

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11. New Mexico
> Projected increase in adults 65+ with Alzheimer’s disease, 2020-2025: 23.3% (from 43,000 to 53,000)
> Pct. of population 65+: 16.9% — 13th highest (total: 352,687)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s disease: 12.2% — 16th highest
> Avg. retirement income: $29,544 — 14th highest

Both the share of residents 65 and older and the share of older residents with Alzheimer’s in New Mexico are among the highest in the country. There were 43,000 residents who were 65 and older and living with Alzheimer’s in 2020. By 2025, that number is expected to rise by 23.3% to 53,000. The increase will lead to higher costs related to the care of Alzheimer’s patients. Medicaid spending on state residents 65 and older with the disease or other forms of dementia is expected to rise by 22.9% by 2025, slightly more than the U.S. projected average increase of 20.2%.