Popular Slang Words That No One Uses Anymore

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26. Dame
> When this word was first in use: 14th century

Dame has Latin and French roots and came to mean an elderly or mature woman in the 14th century. It came to be a slang term for any woman in America in the early 20th century. Its popularity was reflected in the 1949 Richard Rodgers song, “There is Nothin’ Like a Dame,” but it has been out of favor for a long time.

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27. Strumpet
> When this word was first in use: 14th century

The Middle English word strumpet, a female prostitute or a promiscuous woman, appeared in the 14th century. It’s archaic but made a reappearance in James Plunkett’s 1969 novel “Strumpet City,” about Dublin in the early 20th century.

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28. Aliment
> When this word was first in use: 15th century

Aliment, meaning food or nourishment, dates from the 15th century and comes from the Latin alere, meaning to nourish. Nobody says aliment anymore, but everybody has an alimentary canal, the tube in the body through which food passes.

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29. Circumjacent
> When this word was first in use: 15th century

Circumjacent, meaning surrounding, originated in the 15th century and combines the Latin words for around and to lie. We still use words with these components, such as circumnavigate (to travel around) and adjacent (next to).

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30. Jakes
> When this word was first in use: 16th century

The use of jakes for an outdoor toilet dates back at least to the 16th century. There doesn’t seem to be agreement about the origin — some suggest it derives from the French name Jacques. The cognate jacks is still used in Ireland.