Popular Slang Words That No One Uses Anymore

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6. Gadzooks
> When this word was first in use: 17th century

Gadzooks, an expression of surprise or annoyance and a mild oath, possibly derives from God’s hooks, the nails of the Crucifixion.

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7. Walkman
> When this word was first in use: 20th century

The Sony Walkman, a portable cassette player, debuted in 1979 and was in production for 30 years. Once everybody seemed to have a Walkman, now nobody does. The cassette is also history — it gave way to the CD, which gave way to the digital download.

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8. Fourscore
> When this word was first in use: 13th century

A score is twenty and fourscore means four times twenty, or eighty. The term dates back to the 13th century. While it’s no longer used in everyday speech, it’s embedded in the American psyche as the first word of President Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address: “Fourscore and seven years ago….”

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9. Horseless carriage
> When this word was first in use: 19th century

Horseless carriage was an early name for the automobile and dates back to the end of the 19th century. Prior to that, horses were commonly used to pull carriages. Now, nobody says horseless carriage. Even motor car sounds dated.

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10. Zounds
> When this word was first in use: 17th century

Zounds is an expression of surprise or indignation and dates back to the 1600s. It’s another minced oath — an abbreviation of God’s wounds.