Most Hated Pro-Wrestling Champions

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20. Ted DiBiase
> Most Hated Wrestler of the Year awards: 3
> WWE debut: 2008
> WWE appearances: 182
> Daily avg. Wikipedia page views: 939

Donning a black-and-gold tuxedo, frosted tips, and a wad of $100 bills, “Million Dollar Man” Ted DiBiase was a symbol of the runaway wealth of the American upper class in the 1980s and one of the most reviled heels in professional wrestling. DiBiase used his wealth to buy his way to the top, purchasing a spot in the 1989 “Royal Rumble,” superstar contracts, and even the WWE Championship. In addition to his seemingly endless fortune, DiBiase’s heel persona was bolstered by his technical skills in the ring — most notoriously his Million Dollar Dream sleeper hold, which he would often follow by stuffing a $100 bill in the mouth of his unconscious opponent.

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19. Seth Rollins
> Most Hated Wrestler of the Year awards: 3
> WWE debut: 1995
> WWE appearances: 442
> Daily avg. Wikipedia page views: 4,025

One of the most popular pro wrestlers of the modern era, Seth Rollins has drawn praise as both hero and villain in his young career. Rollins shocked the wrestling world on a Monday night in June 2014, when he turned on Dean Ambrose and Roman Reigns — fellow members of The Shield stable. He used a steel chair to the back as he suddenly attacked the two, initiating one of the most memorable heel runs in recent history. Rollins was the runner-up for the Most Hated Wrestler of the Year award in 2014, and he was ultimately given the honor the following year.

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18. Kevin Owens
> Most Hated Wrestler of the Year awards: 3
> WWE debut: 2014
> WWE appearances: 273
> Daily avg. Wikipedia page views: 1,777

The consecutive runner-up for Most Hated Wrestler of the Year from 2015 to 2017, Kevin Owens is one of the most reviled heels in the modern era. Owens is known for his trash talk during in-ring promos as well as his belligerence outside the square circle — feuding with actress Melissa Joan Hart on Twitter and challenging Sir Elton John to a fight when the singer-songwriter cancelled an Orlando show on what was supposed to be a date night for Owens and his wife. While Owens has embraced his classic heel role, issues with management and the star’s growing likeability have led to speculation that the Quebecois wrestler may take a face turn in the near future.

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17. Kevin Sullivan
> Most Hated Wrestler of the Year awards: 3
> WWE debut: N/A
> WWE appearances: N/A
> Daily avg. Wikipedia page views: 529

Kevin Sullivan made his pro wrestling debut in the smaller NWA territories in the 1970s, leaning into his Boston heritage and embracing the nickname “Boston Battler.” Sullivan’s heel persona darkened in the 1980s, as the brawler began to don black and white face paint and body armor made of leather and steel. The newly christened “Prince of Darkness” gave frenzied, cryptic interviews outside of the ring and drew heat with his controversial tactics inside the squared circle. Some of these tactics included starting matches by throwing opponents on the concrete floor and ending them by jumping feet-first into a foe’s sternum. In one instance, he slashed Blackjack Mulligan’s eye with a broken bottle.

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16. Terry Funk
> Most Hated Wrestler of the Year awards: 3
> WWE debut: 1997
> WWE appearances: 30
> Daily avg. Wikipedia page views: 907

In contrast with his brother Dory Jr., who relied on technical skill and savvy, Terry Funk drew heat from audiences for his brash, brawler aesthetic and willingness to engage in bloody, weapon-wielding matches. Funk honed his heel persona in the latter part of his career, reveling in the more violent wrestling style of the ECW in the 1990s and returning to the WWF as the masked, power tool-wielding “Chainsaw Charlie” in 1997. Funk was the second runner-up for Most Hated Wrestler of the Year in 1976 and first runner-up in 1979 and 1989.