This Is the Most Iconic Food Every State Has Given the Rest of the US

Source: millermountainman / Getty Images

South Dakota
> Iconic food: Kuchen

South Dakota’s official state dessert, kuchen is a pastry dough filled with a fruit or custard (or both) filling. It was originally brought to the area by German immigrants and now every South Dakotan family has its own variation on the dessert.

Source: Winter_Studios / Getty Images

Tennessee
> Iconic food: Cotton candy

Originally called fairy floss, cotton candy was created by two Nashville candymakers in 1897 when they invented a machine that heated sugar in a spinning bowl.

Source: Fudio / Getty Images

Texas
> Iconic food: Chili

Chili con carne, or chili with meat, is a dish native to Texas. Though its origins are much disputed, its flavors may have been influenced by immigrants from the Canary Islands, a Spanish possession west of Morocco.

Source: Dimple S / Yelp

Utah
> Iconic food: Fry sauce

This pink secret sauce originally meant as a burger dressing is made from ketchup, mayonnaise, dill pickle juice, garlic, and a secret blend of spices. Invented by Don Carlos Edwards, owner of the restaurant Arctic Circle, it is now Utah’s culinary claim to fame.

Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/mr_t_in_dc/

Vermont
> Iconic food: Ben & Jerry’s

Designer pints of pretzel, cookie dough, and caramel ice cream may be a dime a dozen nowadays, but we can thank childhood buddies Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield for getting this delicious trend started in the 1980s.