These Are the Hardest Dog Breeds to Train

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Kuvasz

The kuvasz is a big working dog originally bred to guard livestock in Hungary. It’s an intelligent and determined breed, but matures slowly. It does not respond well to harsh or repetitive training techniques.

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Beagle

Bred to live and work in packs, beagles are sociable dogs and like the company of their human families, as well as other dogs. They are scent dogs, which can sometimes get them into trouble and means they should not be left off-leash unless in a secured area. Beagles do not respond well to harsh techniques, but require patience and positive reinforcement.

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Greyhound

Greyhounds are sighthounds and famous for their speed. They pursue game independently of humans so training them can be a challenge. They should be socialized from an early age with small animals and children — and they get bored very easily.

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Kerry blue terrier

The Kerry blue terrier is a small muscular breed that was used in England and Ireland for hunting small game and birds. They are smart but need to be socialized and obedience training is recommended

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Bloodhound

The bloodhound is famous for its sense of smell and tracking ability. The breed is used by police forces around the world to find missing people and escaped prisoners. It is instantly recognizable because of its wrinkled face and large drooping ears. Unfortunately, the bloodhound is one of the shortest-lived dog breeds, at seven to nine years. It becomes set in its ways and likes to take charge, so training should start early.