The 50 Absolute Best Songs in History

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40. All Day and All of the Night
> Artist: The Kinks
> Billboard Hot 100 entry date: Dec. 26, 1964
> Total weeks on Billboard Hot 100: 12
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The rockers who were part of the British Invasion in the 1960s had five top-10 hits. “All Day and All of the Night” was one of two of their songs to reach the top 10 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1965.

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39. Loser
> Artist: Beck
> Billboard Hot 100 entry date: Jan. 29, 1994
> Total weeks on Billboard Hot 100: 24
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Alt-rocker Beck (born Bek David Campbell) scored his lone top-10 hit “Loser” in 1994. Beck said he wrote the song as kind of a joke. He said a friend kept calling him a loser, so he incorporated that into the chorus of the song.

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38. Happy Together
> Artist: The Turtles
> Billboard Hot 100 entry date: Feb. 11, 1967
> Total weeks on Billboard Hot 100: 15
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“Happy Together” was the signature song for the Los Angeles-based pop group. The single went to No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100, their lone chart-topper, and had the distinction of knocking off the Beatles’ “Penny Lane” from the top perch.

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37. White Rabbit
> Artist: Jefferson Airplane
> Billboard Hot 100 entry date: June 24, 1967
> Total weeks on Billboard Hot 100: 10
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“White Rabbit” is an unabashed song about drug use that includes allusions to Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland.” Lead singer Grace Slick urges listeners to “feed your head,” a call to liberate your mind and your senses. Young people were listening — the song was the San Francisco group’s second biggest single, reaching No. 8 in July of 1967. The song was covered extensively by artists such as Patti Smith and Pink.

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36. School’s Out
> Artist: Alice Cooper
> Billboard Hot 100 entry date: June 3, 1972
> Total weeks on Billboard Hot 100: 13
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The early goth rocker was a major rock act in the early 1970s, and “School’s Out,” a playfully defiant single, rose to No.7 on the Billboard Hot 100 in July of 1972. It was the title track of Cooper’s fifth studio album.

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35. Proud Mary
> Artist: Creedence Clearwater Revival
> Billboard Hot 100 entry date: Jan. 25, 1969
> Total weeks on Billboard Hot 100: 14
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The California rockers had four songs reach No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100, and “Proud Mary” was their biggest hit and the song most associated with the band. Ike and Tina Turner, among the many artists who covered the song, did a scorching version, which went to No. 4 on Billboard.

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34. Rockin’ Robin
> Artist: Bobby Day
> Billboard Hot 100 entry date: Aug. 4, 1958
> Total weeks on Billboard Hot 100: 21
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Rock music in the 1950s was about having fun, and that was the case with “Rockin’ Robin.” It was the biggest hit for Bobby Day, a musician from Texas, whose single went to No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 in October of 1958. The song has been covered by a number of artists, most notably by Michael Jackson in 1972, which also went to No. 2.

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33. Golden Years
> Artist: David Bowie
> Billboard Hot 100 entry date: Dec. 13, 1975
> Total weeks on Billboard Hot 100: 21
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Rock and roll’s most famous chameleon reached the top 10 with “Golden Years” in April of 1976. Bowie reportedly offered the song to Elvis Presley, who turned it down. The song was used as the theme song of Stephen King’s “Golden Years” and in the movie “A Knight’s Tale.”

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32. Be My Baby
> Artist: The Ronettes
> Billboard Hot 100 entry date: Aug. 31, 1963
> Total weeks on Billboard Hot 100: 13
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Led by singer Ronnie Spector, girl group The Ronettes reached No. 2 on the Hot 100 in 1963 with their song “Be My Baby.” Written by Phil Spector, Jeff Barry, and Ellie Greenwich, the song has been referred to as “the greatest record ever produced” by the Beach Boys’ Brian Wilson.

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31. Won’t Get Fooled Again
> Artist: The Who
> Billboard Hot 100 entry date: July 17, 1971
> Total weeks on Billboard Hot 100: 13
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With a running time of 8:32 minutes, “Won’t Get Fooled Again” is not a typical pop song. No matter. For nearly 50 years, the anti-anthem (“Meet the new boss, same as the old boss”) has been on the short list of the greatest rock songs of all time, remembered for its pioneering use of synthesizers, Pete Townshend’s growling guitar, Keith Moon’s thunderous drumming, and the most famous scream in rock history from Roger Daltrey. The song is used in the intro to the crime series “CSI: Miami.”