States Where Alzheimer’s Is Expected to Increase Significantly

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19. Delaware (tied)
> Projected increase in adults 65+ with Alzheimer’s disease, 2020-2025: 21.1% (from 19,000 to 23,000)
> Pct. of population 65+: 18.2% — 5th highest (total: 174,174)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s disease: 10.9% — 12th lowest
> Avg. retirement income: $30,734 — 10th highest

In Delaware, the Alzheimer’s Association forecasts a 21.1% increase in Alzheimer’s cases among the 65 and older population between 2020 and 2025 as well as 23.6% increase in Medicaid costs related to caring for older residents with the condition. The state’s 65 and older residents comprise 18.2% of the population, the fifth highest share of all states. As of 2019, Delaware had 17 geriatricians, doctors specializing in health care for older people, fewer doctors than in only seven other states.

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19. Colorado (tied)
> Projected increase in adults 65+ with Alzheimer’s disease, 2020-2025: 21.1% (from 76,000 to 92,000)
> Pct. of population 65+: 13.8% — 5th lowest (total: 773,706)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s disease: 9.8% — 2nd lowest
> Avg. retirement income: $31,654 — 6th highest

Alzheimer’s disease mostly affects older people, and Colorado is a relatively young state. State residents who are 65 and older comprise just 13.8% of the population, the fifth lowest share, and only 9.8% of them have Alzheimer’s, the second lowest share. The U.S. Census estimates that the 65 and older population will grow by 32.0% until 2030 and will then comprise 21.0% of the state’s total population. The mortality rate is also relatively low, at 33 Alzheimer’s-related deaths per 100,000 people, the fifth lowest in the country.

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18. Minnesota
> Projected increase in adults 65+ with Alzheimer’s disease, 2020-2025: 21.2% (from 99,000 to 120,000)
> Pct. of population 65+: 15.4% — 18th lowest (total: 858,698)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s disease: 11.5% — 24th lowest
> Avg. retirement income: $25,897 — 25th lowest

Alzheimer’s disease claimed 2,436 lives in Minnesota in 2019, or 43 per 100,000 residents. The number of people living with the condition is projected to rise by 21.2%, from 99,000 to 120,000 in the next five years. Medicaid costs related to treating the disease among the state’s older population are estimated to increase by 20.1% by 2025, about the same as the national average projected increase of 20.2%.

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16. Oregon (tied)
> Projected increase in adults 65+ with Alzheimer’s disease, 2020-2025: 21.7% (from 69,000 to 84,000)
> Pct. of population 65+: 17.2% — 11th highest (total: 709,555)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s disease: 9.7% — the lowest
> Avg. retirement income: $28,384 — 18th highest

Oregon has the 11th highest share of residents who are 65 and older. While only 9.7% of 65 and over residents have Alzheimer’s, the lowest share among all states, the mortality rate is relatively high. In 2018, there were 47 Alzheimer’s-related deaths per 100,000 people, the eighth highest rate in the county and higher than the U.S. rate of 37 deaths per 100,000 people.

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16. California (tied)
> Projected increase in adults 65+ with Alzheimer’s disease, 2020-2025: 21.7% (from 690,000 to 840,000)
> Pct. of population 65+: 14.0% — 6th lowest (total: 5,486,041)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s disease: 12.6% — 10th highest
> Avg. retirement income: $34,209 — 3rd highest

About 14.0% of California’s residents are 65 and older, the sixth lowest share in the country, and 12.6% of them have the disease, the 10th highest such share. The number of people 65 and older with Alzheimer’s is expected to increase by about over 21%, from 690,000 in 2020 to 840,000 in 2025. Medicaid spending on Alzheimer’s patients is expected to grow by 24.7% in the next five years, well above the average increase of 20.2% expected nationwide.