States Where Alzheimer’s Is Expected to Increase Significantly

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30. Arkansas
> Projected increase in adults 65+ with Alzheimer’s disease, 2020-2025: 15.5% (from 58,000 to 67,000)
> Pct. of population 65+: 16.6% — 19th highest (total: 498,778)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s disease: 11.6% — 24th highest
> Avg. retirement income: $21,770 — 3rd lowest

The number of Arkansas residents 65 and older with Alzheimer’s is projected to grow from approximately 58,000 in 2020 to 67,000 in 2025, a 15.5% increase. This is below the projected 18.5% increase nationwide. Retired Arkansas residents with Alzheimer’s may struggle to afford care as the state’s average retirement income of $21,770 is the third lowest of all states.

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29. Michigan
> Projected increase in adults 65+ with Alzheimer’s disease, 2020-2025: 15.8% (from 190,000 to 220,000)
> Pct. of population 65+: 16.7% — 17th highest (total: 1,666,343)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s disease: 11.4% — 22nd lowest
> Avg. retirement income: $24,096 — 17th lowest

The number of Alzheimer’s cases among older Michigan residents is projected to increase by 15.8% between 2020 and 2025, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. In Michigan, 16.7% of residents are in the main risk group for developing Alzheimer’s disease — those aged 65 and older. Comparatively, 15.6% of Americans are at least 65 years old.

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26. Tennessee (tied)
> Projected increase in adults 65+ with Alzheimer’s disease, 2020-2025: 16.7% (from 120,000 to 140,000)
> Pct. of population 65+: 16.0% — 25th lowest (total: 1,075,124)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s disease: 11.2% — 20th lowest
> Avg. retirement income: $23,541 — 10th lowest

The total number of Alzheimer’s disease cases among Tennessee residents 65 and older is projected to increase from 120,000 in 2020 to 140,000 by 2025 — a 16.7% increase. Despite the fact that a relatively low share of older Tennessee residents have Alzheimer’s, at 11.2%, the state is tied for the seventh highest Alzheimer’s mortality rate among all states. There were 48 deaths related to the disease for every 100,000 Tennessee residents in 2019, well above the nationwide mortality rate of 37 deaths per 100,000 people.

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26. North Carolina (tied)
> Projected increase in adults 65+ with Alzheimer’s disease, 2020-2025: 16.7% (from 180,000 to 210,000)
> Pct. of population 65+: 15.9% — 22nd lowest (total: 1,628,013)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s disease: 11.1% — 16th lowest
> Avg. retirement income: $24,693 — 20th lowest

The number of older North Carolina residents with Alzheimer’s disease is projected to grow from 180,000 in 2020 to 210,000 in 2025, a 16.7% increase. Of all North Carolinians age 65 and older, 11.1% have Alzheimer’s disease. Though this is a lower percentage than in the majority of states, Alzheimer’s deaths are still more common than in most states. North Carolina reported 43 Alzheimer’s-related deaths per 100,000 residents, compared with 37 deaths per 100,000 people across the U.S.

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26. Washington (tied)
> Projected increase in adults 65+ with Alzheimer’s disease, 2020-2025: 16.7% (from 120,000 to 140,000)
> Pct. of population 65+: 15.1% — 11th lowest (total: 1,117,673)
> Pct. of 65+ pop. with Alzheimer’s disease: 10.7% — 9th lowest
> Avg. retirement income: $28,454 — 17th highest

Washington is one of three states, along with North Carolina and Tennessee, in which the total number of residents ages 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease is projected to increase by 16.7%. Though this ranks toward the middle of all states, it is below the projected nationwide increase of 18.5%.