Popular Slang Words That No One Uses Anymore

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16. Coxcomb
> When this word was first in use: 16th century

Coxcomb started out as cock’s comb, or cockscomb. It was the traditional cap worn by a jester — a professional fool — and resembled a rooster. In the 16th century, it came to mean a vain and conceited man, or dandy.

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17. Buss
> When this word was first in use: 16th century

Buss, a kiss, is another 16th century word that is no longer in use. It is akin to the French noun baiser and the German Kuss.

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18. Peeler
> When this word was first in use: 19th century

Police officers in Britain were once commonly referred to as Peelers. The term derived from Sir Robert Peel (1788 –1850), who established London’s Metropolitan Police Force. The term Bobbies, which was also inspired by Sir Robert, is still in use.

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19. Apothecary
> When this word was first in use: 14th century

The word apothecary, meaning a person who prepares and sells medicine, derived from the Latin word apotheca, or storehouse. Two words with similar origins are still in use — bodega and boutique.

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20. Camelopard
> When this word was first in use: 14th century

Camelopard, or giraffe, dates back to the 14th century. While it has Greek and Latin roots and is totally archaic, it’s easy enough to see its origin — it combines the words for camel and leopard.