Every Movie to Win Best Drama at the Golden Globes Since 1944

Source: Courtesy of Universal Pictures

1994
> Winner: Schindler’s List
> Directed by: Steven Spielberg
> Produced by: Steven Spielberg, Branko Lustig, Gerald R. Molen
> Nominees: The Age of Innocence; In the Name of the Father; The Piano; The Remains of the Day

Steven Spielberg’s deeply moving film about how a Sudeten German industrialist saved the lives of hundreds of Jews from the Holocaust won three Golden Globes for Best Motion Picture – Drama, Best Director – Motion Picture for Spielberg (the first of his three Globes), and Best Screenplay – Motion Picture (Steve Zaillian). The movie was nominated for 12 Academy Awards and won seven.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

1995
> Winner: Forrest Gump
> Directed by: Robert Zemeckis
> Produced by: Wendy Finerman, Steve Starkey, Steve Tisch
> Nominees: Legends of the Fall; Nell; Pulp Fiction; Quiz Show

The movie is a panorama of American history beginning in the 1950s as experienced through a mentally slow Alabama man played by Tom Hanks, who won the Golden Globe for Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama, the third of his eight Globe wins. Hanks also won the Oscar for that role, and director Robert Zemeckis won a Globe and Academy Award.

Source: Courtesy of Columbia Pictures

1996
> Winner: Sense and Sensibility
> Directed by: Ang Lee
> Produced by: Lindsay Doran
> Nominees: Apollo 13; Braveheart; The Bridges of Madison County; Leaving Las Vegas

British actress Emma Thompson won her second Golden Globe, this one for Best Screenplay – Motion Picture, for the period piece directed by acclaimed director Ang Lee. Thompson won the film’s lone Academy Award for Best Writing.

Source: Courtesy of Miramax

1997
> Winner: The English Patient
> Directed by: Anthony Minghella
> Produced by: Saul Zaentz
> Nominees: Breaking the Waves; The People vs. Larry Flynt; Secrets & Lies; Shine

“The English Patient,” about a relationship during World War II between a nurse and a badly burned Allied pilot, won two Golden Globes, including for Best Original Score – Motion Picture. The film did much better at the Academy Awards, nabbing nine statues.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

1998
> Winner: Titanic
> Directed by: James Cameron
> Produced by: James Cameron and Jon Landau
> Nominees: Amistad; The Boxer; Good Will Hunting; L.A. Confidential

James Cameron’s blockbuster story about the lives of passengers aboard the doomed ocean liner won four Golden Globes, including Best Director for Cameron. “Titanic” would go on to become one of only three films in Oscar history to win 11 Academy Awards.

Source: Courtesy of DreamWorks Pictures

1999
> Winner: Saving Private Ryan
> Directed by: Steven Spielberg
> Produced by: Steven Spielberg, Ian Bryce, Mark Gordon, Gary Levinsohn
> Nominees: Elizabeth; Gods and Monsters; The Horse Whisperer; The Truman Show

“Saving Private Ryan,” Steven Spielberg’s homage to the generation that won World War II, took home two Golden Globes, including Best Director – Motion Picture for Spieberg. He also took home the Best Director Oscar, one of five Academy Awards the movie won.

Source: Courtesy of DreamWorks Pictures

2000
> Winner: American Beauty
> Directed by: Sam Mendes
> Produced by: Bruce Cohen, Dan Jinks
> Nominees: The End of the Affair; The Hurricane; The Insider; The Talented Mr. Ripley

“American Beauty” is an acerbic comment on American suburban life. Director Sam Mendes won one of the three Golden Globes awarded to the film, and he also won one of the movie’s five Oscars. Alan Ball won a Globe and an Oscar for best screenplay.

Source: Courtesy of DreamWorks Pictures

2001
> Winner: Gladiator
> Directed by: Ridley Scott
> Produced by: Douglas Wick, Branko Lustig, David Franzoni
> Nominees: Billy Elliot; Erin Brockovich; Sunshine; Traffic; Wonder Boys

Russell Crowe does a star turn as an embittered former Roman general turned gladiator who seeks revenge on the corrupt emperor who killed his family. Besides winning for Best Motion Picture – Drama, the Ridley Scott-helmed epic won the Golden Globe for Best Original Score – Motion Picture. “Gladiator” would go on to win five Academy Awards.

Source: Courtesy of Universal Pictures

2002
> Winner: A Beautiful Mind
> Directed by: Ron Howard
> Produced by: Brian Grazer, Ron Howard
> Nominees: In the Bedroom; The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring; The Man Who Wasn’t There; Mulholland Drive

“A Beautiful Mind” stars Russell Crowe as John Nash, a brilliant mathematician tortured by mental illness who eventually triumphs over his affliction to win the Nobel Prize. Crowe won one of four Golden Globes for Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama, and Jennifer Connelly took home a Globe and an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress as Nash’s tormented wife.

Source: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

2003
> Winner: The Hours
> Directed by: Stephen Daldry
> Produced by: Robert Fox and Scott Rudin
> Nominees: About Schmidt; Gangs of New York; The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers; The Pianist

Nicole Kidman won the third of her five Golden Globes and her first Oscar playing the English writer Virginia Woolf, one of three generations of women who deal with suicide in “The Hours.”