American Cities Getting the Least Amount of Sleep

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Sleep deprivation is a major concern, and most Americans are not getting enough z’s. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that 35.2% of American adults usually get less than the recommended amount of sleep, which the CDC says is seven hours of sleep over a 24-hour period.

People in some cities get less sleep than others. To determine the 55 cities getting the least sleep, 24/7 Tempo reviewed the share of adults reporting fewer than seven hours of sleep on average in U.S. metro areas from the 2021 County Health Rankings & Roadmaps report.

There are many reasons why we don’t get enough shut-eye. Inconsistent bedtimes, using technology late at night, shift work, long work hours, stress, and sleep apnea can all affect the duration and quality of sleep. Here are 19 secrets to a good night’s sleep.

Not getting enough sleep carries serious consequences — lack of concentration while driving and mistakes made at work are among them. Sleep deprivation also has been linked to chronic conditions such as Type 2 diabetes, obesity, and depression. 

Lack of sleep becomes less of an issue with age, as just 26.3% of U.S. adults over 65 report short sleep duration, according to a survey done by the CDC in 2014.

Cities in the Rust Belt states of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Michigan, and cities in states along the Appalachian Mountains such as Tennessee, West Virginia, and Kentucky get the least sleep. As for counties, this is the most sleep deprived county in every state.

New York, the city that never sleeps, missed the 55 cities getting the least sleep and ranks 106 among the 384 metro areas considered. The city that gets the least sleep might surprise you.

Here are the cities getting the least sleep

To determine the cities getting the least sleep, 24/7 Tempo reviewed the share of adults reporting fewer than seven hours of sleep on average in the 384 U.S. metro areas. Data is from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute joint program’s 2021 County Health Rankings & Roadmaps report. Insufficient sleep figures published in the report are from 2018. 

All other data came from the CHR, and figures are for the most recent year available. Population figures are one-year estimates for the 18 years and over age group from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey 2019.