Best Pizza Place in Every State

Source: Courtesy of Pizzeria Orso via Facebook

Virginia: Pizzeria Orso
> Location: Falls Church

Opened in 2010 by the owners of the same community’s upscale French-accented 2941 Restaurant, and under the supervision of its executive chef, Daniel Boulud veteran Bertrand Chemel, Orso bakes Neapolitan-style pizzas in an imported Italian wood-fired dome oven. Besides the house creations, from a simple cheese pizza to the Capricciosa (ham, artichokes, cremini mushrooms, olives, basil, mozzarella, and tomato sauce), the menu proposes about 25 optional toppings for do-it-yourselfers, and also sells a home pizza kit including dough, San Marzano tomato sauce, bufala mozzarella, grana, and fresh basil.

Source: Courtesy of Dino's Tomato Pie via Facebook

Washington: Dino’s Tomato Pie
> Location: Seattle

Seattle pizza maven Brandon Pettit slings seven variations on 18-inch rounds or square Sicilian crusts, using his custom brick ovens. Extra toppings are available, but as a note on his website points out, “more than three toppings will be expensive and won’t be any better.” His Sicilians are the right move, airy and crunchy, with sides crisped with blackened cheese.

Source: Courtesy of Vito's Pizza & Restaurant via Facebook

West Virginia: Vito’s Pizza & Restaurant
> Location: Clarksburg

There are no fancy combinations here at this three-decade-old family-owned pizzeria in the north-central portion of the state – just thin-crust Neapolitan rounds (three sizes) or thick Sicilian squares (two sizes) with a choice of standard toppings (pepperoni, anchovies, hot peppers, mushrooms, etc.). If pizza isn’t on your mind, calzones, hoagies, and pasta dishes are also available.

Source: Courtesy of Maria's Pizza via Facebook

Wisconsin: Maria’s Pizza
> Location: Milwaukee

Maria Traxel opened her original pizzeria in 1957 and the current location (the only one remaining) in 1971. Her daughter, Bonnie Crivello, is co-owner here, and she’s kept things simple and old-school: Order a 14-inch round or an 18-inch rectangle, both served on baking sheets not quite big enough to hold them, and choose between toppings that don’t go far beyond cheese, sausage, and/or pepperoni (though a couple of specialties admit a few vegetables) – and make sure you’ve brought cash, as no credit cards or checks are accepted.

Source: Courtesy of Racca's Pizzeria Napoletana-Casper via Facebook

Wyoming: Racca’s Pizzeria Napoletana
> Location: Casper

Mark Dym and Kristy Latorraca Dym opened their first pizzeria in Denver in 2008 – the first such operation in the state to be certified by the Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana, which defines authentic Neapolitan-style pizza. Today, they maintain two Colorado locations, both called Marco’s Coal Fired, as well as this Wyoming outpost – originally called Marco’s as well. Ten 12-inch specialty pizzas include the Toscana (fresh mozzarella, tomato sauce, arugula, prosciutto di Parma, pecorino sardo, and grape tomatoes) and the Liguria (fresh mozzarella, pecorino romano, limoncello chicken breast, red onions, grape tomatoes, and pesto). About 30 toppings are available for DIY pizza aficionados to add to regular or gluten-free crusts.

Sponsored: Tips for Investing

A financial advisor can help you understand the advantages and disadvantages of investment properties. Finding a qualified financial advisor doesn’t have to be hard. SmartAsset’s free tool matches you with up to three financial advisors who serve your area, and you can interview your advisor matches at no cost to decide which one is right for you. If you’re ready to find an advisor who can help you achieve your financial goals, get started now.

Investing in real estate can diversify your portfolio. But expanding your horizons may add additional costs. If you’re an investor looking to minimize expenses, consider checking out online brokerages. They often offer low investment fees, helping you maximize your profit.