Animals Roaming Freely While Humans Are in Lockdown

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26. Wild pigs
> Location where seen: Paris, France

Paris in springtime is usually crowded with tourists and is one of the most visited cities in the world. But with tourism way down and residents huddling inside because of the lockdown, wild pigs took to the streets of the French capital.

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27. Wild pumas
> Location where seen: Santiago, Chile

Wild pumas were seen on the streets of Santiago, the capital city of Chile, with one captured on video leaping on and climbing over a wall. One of the predators was tranquilized and another was captured and released in the mountains nearby. Marcelo Giagnoni, the nation’s director of Agriculture and Livestock Service, called the situation in Chile a unique phenomenon in history, with a total health quarantine.

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28. Wild turkeys
> Location where seen: Oakland, California

The Bay Area in California was one of the first to shut down as six counties with 6 million people were locked down on March 16. Four days later, a gang of wild turkeys was spotted on the playground of an elementary school in Oakland. Turkeys are not indigenous to California. They were introduced from Texas by the California Fish and Game Commission as a trophy hunting bird in the 20th century.

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29. Peafowl
> Location where seen: Mumbai, India

An ostentation of peafowl apparently left their habitat in the Doongerwadi Forest in India to hit the streets of Mumbai, India, in early April. There are three species of the bird — the blue peacock lives in India and Sri Lanka, the green peacock inhabits Java and Myanmar, and the Congo peacock can be found in African rainforests.

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30. Puffins
> Location where seen: Calanque National Park, France

Atlantic puffins that live in the protected areas of France’s Calanques National Park near Marseille on the Mediterranean, are venturing into areas normally occupied by people. The International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources considers the puffin vulnerable. The IUCN estimates the number of puffins between 12 million and 14 million and says the population trend is decreasing because of hunting, pollution, climate change, and diseases.