America’s Most Popular Dog Breeds

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80. Staffordshire Bull Terriers
> 2017 rank: 82
> 2016 rank: 82
> 2007 rank: Not in Top 100

Bull terriers were originally bred in England for the cruel sport of bull-baiting, and this breed was particularly popular in the county of Staffordshire, hence the name. They were brought to America in the mid-19th century, where the AmStaff was then bred.

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79. Chinese Crested
> 2017 rank: 79
> 2016 rank: 77
> 2007 rank: 52

The Chinese crested is a toy dog with a distinctive hairdo that gives it its name. It is an affectionate dog with some cat-like traits — it likes to sit in high places. It’s also popular in movies. Kate Hudson had a Chinese crested in “How To Lose A Guy In 10 Days,” and the Olsen twins had one in “New York Minute.”

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78. Giant Schnauzers
> 2017 rank: 80
> 2016 rank: 79
> 2007 rank: 83

The giant schnauzer is a larger and stronger version of the standard schnauzer and can weigh as much as 95 pounds. It was developed in the Bavarian Alps in the mid-19th century to drive cattle from farm to market. It has also been used as a military and police dog.

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77. Irish Setters
> 2017 rank: 72
> 2016 rank: 76
> 2007 rank: 66

Irish setters are famous for their fine red coats, their grace, and speed. These dogs thrive on human companionship and get along well with children and other dogs. They like vigorous exercise and lots of it.

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76. Irish Wolfhounds
> 2017 rank: 73
> 2016 rank: 73
> 2007 rank: 80

As its name suggests, the Irish wolfhound was used to hunt wolves, which it did very successfully — there haven’t been any wolves in Ireland for hundreds of years. You need space to have an Irish wolfhound as a pet as it’s the tallest of all AKC breeds and can weigh as much as 180 pounds.

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75. Chow Chows
> 2017 rank: 76
> 2016 rank: 74
> 2007 rank: 63

The chow chow is a member of the AKC’s Non-Sporting Group and does fine without a lot of exercise. Its deep-set eyes give it a serious look. It comes in a variety of colors, including red, black, and blue. The chow chow is one of two AKC registered breeds with a unique blue-black tongue, the other being the Chinese shar-pei.

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74. Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs
> 2017 rank: 75
> 2016 rank: 78
> 2007 rank: 90

The greater Swiss mountain dog is descended from war dogs brought across the Alps by Julius Caesar’s armies, but it was only fully recognized by the AKC in 1995. It is a large, powerful working dog. It needs regular exercise and does not cope well with hot weather.

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73. Italian Greyhounds
> 2017 rank: 74
> 2016 rank: 72
> 2007 rank: 59

The Italian greyhound is a miniature version of its relative the greyhound. The ancient breed was popular with European royalty and is featured in numerous Renaissance paintings. It’s a sighthound — as opposed to a scenthound — and will pursue fast-moving prey.

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72. Old English Sheepdogs
> 2017 rank: 70
> 2016 rank: 75
> 2007 rank: 72

The old English sheepdog is famous for its shaggy double coat and has been immortalized in Disney films such as “The Shaggy Dog” and “101 Dalmatians.” The coat is warm and waterproof and allows the dog to blend in with the sheep it herds. The old English sheepdog makes a great pet, but it requires a lot of grooming.

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71. Lhasa Apsos
> 2017 rank: 77
> 2016 rank: 71
> 2007 rank: 49

The Lhasa apso is an ancient breed from Tibet, where it served as a companion and watchdog in isolated monasteries. It can be cute, mischievous, and deeply devoted — and remains frolicsome even as an adult.