50 Easy Ways to Be a Healthier Person

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Socialize

Socialization benefits include having more social support, possibly living longer, and feeling less isolated. Interactions with others reduces feelings of depression, and according to a study published by the National Library of Medicine, a socially active lifestyle might protect people against dementia. To boost social engagement, participate in online meetings with family and friends; do volunteer work; attend museums and concerts; go to the library or community centers; or play a group sport like bocce or bowling.

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Dance

Dancing is another way to socialize, and you don’t have to be a salsa or ballroom dancing pro to enjoy the benefits. As a cardio activity, dancing improves the condition of your heart and lungs; boosts muscular strength, endurance, and motor fitness; provides better weight management; reduces risk of osteoporosis; improves agility, flexibility, and balance; and lifts your confidence. Pick the right dance for you. Warm up and drink plenty of water before you get out on the dance floor, and don’t overdo it.

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Eat breakfast

Breakfast has been called the most important meal of the day. According to WebMD, for breakfast you should pair carbohydrates with proteins. Carbs give you the energy boost and proteins provide the endurance. These combinations are suggested by WebMD: Whole-grain cereals or bread for carbs, low-fat milk, yogurt, or cottage cheese for protein; fresh fruit or veggies, for carbs, nuts or legumes for protein.

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Limit simple sugars

Consuming too much sugar can lead to a greater risk of weight gain, diabetes, tooth decay, and other health problems. Even healthier food options like dairy items, vegetables, and fruit naturally contain sugar. The average adult in the United States consumes around 308 calories per day from added sugar, more than the American Heart Association’s (AHA) recommendations, which is 100 calories from added sugars for females and 150 calories for males.

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Think positively

Cleric Dr. Norman Vincent Peale was on to something when he wrote the best-selling book “The Power of Positive of Thinking” in 1952. Positive thinkers have longer lifespans, lower rates of depression, reduced risk of death from cardiovascular disease, greater resistance to colds, and coping mechanisms during stressful periods. Positive thinkers are also inclined to live more healthy lifestyles, exercising more, eating more healthy foods, and not drinking or smoking excessively.