45 Fall Superfoods That Won’t Break the Bank

A shopping cart full of fancy foods can really put a dent in one’s budget. There’s no denying that some super healthy foods are also super pricey. But there’s also no denying that grocery stores offer many choices, and stocking up on superfoods without going broke is actually a realistic possibility.

24/7 Tempo compiled a list of affordable fall superfood by first identifying produce that are in season in the fall according to the United States Department of Agriculture. Prices are primarily simple weighted average prices for non-organic produce from the USDA’s National Retail Report for specialty crops for the period between Aug. 17 and Aug. 29.

No doubt, you’ve come across the comparison of what $5 can get you in terms of food — be it at a fast food menu item or between a pound or two of Apples — and we’re not even talking organic. But not all healthy foods are so expensive. This is a common misconception, and it’s not the only one – these are at least 28 myths that can end up packing on pounds.

A limited budget doesn’t have to keep you from a healthy diet. “Superfoods” is a term used to describe items that have few calories and little to no sugar or salt but contain an abundance of healthy boosters.

“Superfoods” is not a scientific term, and science is not 100% conclusive about the health benefits of fruits and vegetables labeled as such. What’s certain is that these foods have high amounts of vitamins and minerals, which, collectively, support the immune system and help fight disease.

Methodology 

To compile a list of affordable fall superfoods, 24/7 Tempo first identified produce that are in season in the fall according to the United States Department of Agriculture. We then consulted a clinical nutritionist and reviewed several sources, including the National Institutes of Health and online reviews of medical research on the benefits these fruits and vegetables offer.

Prices are primarily simple weighted average prices for non-organic produce from theUSDA’s National Retail Report for specialty crops for the period between Aug. 17 and Aug. 29.

Prices for items not covered in the report were sourced from Walmart, the country’s largest grocery retailer, ShopRite, a supermarket cooperative with more than 250 units in six Eastern states, or the USDA Economic Research Service’s Consumer Price Index. Produce prices change constantly according to weather conditions and other factors and prices vary from region to region.