24 Milkshakes With More Calories Than an Entire Meal

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Milkshakes have been around since at least the late 19th century — there was mention of an “an Atlanta drink” called “milk shake,” in the Atlanta Constitution in 1886. That prototype milkshake included just milk, crushed ice, “a mixture of unknown ingredients,” and “a bit of any desired sirup,” as the newspaper explained.” Eventually, people started using ice cream and cookies, creating a real caloric bomb, albeit an irresistibly delicious one.

Dieticians estimate Americans should break down their meal consumption throughout the day as follows: 300 to 400 calories for breakfast and 500 to 700 calories each for lunch and dinner, plus about 200 for snacks.

Most people are more likely to overeat rather than undereat, so 24/7 Tempo reviewed the menus of more than a dozen chain restaurants to compile a list of milkshakes that exceeded 700 calories. Calorie counts were taken either from the nutritional information provided by the chain on its website or from Nutrition Charts, a food nutrition data site.

Most places that make good shakes offer them in great variety, going beyond just the classic chocolate, strawberry, and vanilla. Bits of cookie, candy, even cake get mixed into shakes, which significantly add to the total caloric amount.

Shakes became popular in the 1950s. They can still be found in just about every burger joint or diner in America — and this is the best diner in every state.

Many of the milkshakes at popular fast-food operations actually fall below the 700 number — but largely due to their size. If people order the mini or small version, they will most likely consume a drink with 400 to 700 calories. But who orders a mini shake?

Some shakes have calorie counts that not only exceed the standard for a single meal but come very close to the recommended intake for an entire day of about 2,000 calories. This is how long you need to exercise to burn off the calories from your favorite foods.