22 Easy Remedies That Can Help Relieve Allergy Suffering

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Probiotics

Some research suggests that probiotics are beneficial in treating spring allergies, but it may depend on the specific allergen, method of administration, and dosing. A 2017 study by the University of Florida determined that a combination of probiotics — lactobacilli and bifidobacteria, sold as Kyo-Dophilus in stores — may help relieve allergy symptoms by raising the amount of T-cells in the immune system, thus increasing tolerance to hay fever symptoms.

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Ginger

Ginger has been known to have anti-inflammatory properties, and a spring allergy is basically inflammation of the nasal airways due to an irritant. A 2016 mice study suggests that ginger – whether fresh or dry — may suppress the production of pro-inflammatory proteins in the blood, which may lead to reduced allergy symptoms. It is still to be investigated to see whether the effect will be similar in humans.

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Wash the A/C filter

An important step to reduce allergy symptoms is to control allergy-causing pollution. You may be able to achieve that by installing an air filtration system. Mechanical filters are designed to trap allergens such as pollen, pet dander, and dust mites in a special screen. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology suggests cleaning or replacing small-particle filters in heating and cooling systems as well as in air conditioners at least once every 30 days.

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No mascara

Allergens like pollen can live on the skin and hair. Mascara will trap the pollen, which may eventually drop into the eyes. Avoid hair gels, mousse, and hair sprays, too. They can also trap pollen, dust, and other particles you may be allergic to very close to the eyes and nose.

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No contact lenses

If you wear corrective lenses, replace them with regular glasses for the duration of the spring allergies season. Pollen can get trapped behind the lenses. Your instinct is to rub your eyes, which means you’re basically rubbing up the pollen against the inside of the eyelid, leading to itchy and red eyes. Possible and more serious damage is corneal abrasion, a scratch on the eye’s cornea caused by rubbing itchy eyes with contacts in.

If you really prefer contact lenses and no amount of cleaning reduces this common allergy trigger, consider using daily disposable ones.