20 Things Pharmacists Want You to Know

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6. Contact your insurance provider to avoid overpaying

Another way you may save money is reaching out to your insurance company and asking what medications they cover. “There may be 10 drugs in one class and it’s typical for the insurance to cover just one of them,” Moore said. “If you know which one, and your doctor agrees you can take it, your copay may be significantly less.”

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7. Don’t ever rush the pharmacist

Long lines at the pharmacy are common but there may be a good reason for it. Pharmacists are often double-checking that pills have been dispensed in a safe and effective matter, Moore said. “So if they tell you they’ll be there in a minute, respect that one minute and don’t rush them,” she added.

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8. Drive-thru pharmacies are not as quick as you think

Drive-thru pharmacies have become increasingly popular all over the world. They operate pretty much like fast food drive-thru places most people are familiar with: you ask for your medication at one window and wait in your car to pick it up through another window. It sounds effective, but it’s actually not that quick, Moore said. It’s not uncommon to have to wait 15-30 minutes before your prescription is filled, she filled.

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9. No walk-ups at drive-thru pharmacies

Also much like many fast food drive-thrus, you can’t walk up to the window and expect to be served. Many drive-thrus have a policy not to help such customers out of safety concerns. Pharmacists are not allowed to open the window to walkers, which can result in a lot of complaints and a longer waiting line.

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10. Splitting pills can be dangerous

Rationing pills seems like a good option if you’re trying to save money by expanding the time before you have to refill your prescription as much as possible. But splitting pills is not safe unless you are told by the pharmacists that you can do it, Moore said. “Some pills are manufactured in a way that if you split them you may be getting a high dose of the medication in one day and none on another day.”